Computer Help Community

Community

Cyber Tech Help Community

New Tutorials

PC Tutorials

New Downloads

More Downloads
PC Downloads

Member Testimonials

Open Member Quote   Keep up the good work and thank you all. I recommend you to all my friends whom have problems. I tell them to come here, read, and post. Have a good day - moon15431  Close Member Quote
Member Testimonials
MY CYBER TECH HELP

LATEST TOPICS

Tech Help Community

Free Antivirus Scan

Free Virus Scan and a listing of the top 10 viruses in the wild - Free Antivirus Scan
Free Online Antivirus Scan

File Extension Database

Find what program a filetype belongs to in our searchable File Extension Database.
File Extension Database

Related Microsoft Links

Services
Cyber Tech Help Community

To the top of the page to top

 



Computing News | Antispyware firm warns of massive ID theft ring

Latest News Latest News | News ArchiveNews Archive | Cyber Tech Help News RSS Feed!

Posted by: Tweaker
Date added: 16:19 Sunday, 7th August 2005 GMT
Source: Computer World

Officials at Sunbelt Software, a Clearwater, Fla.-based vendor of antispyware tools, said the company stumbled upon a massive ID theft ring that is using a well-known spyware program to break into and systematically steal confidential information from an unknown number of computers worldwide.

A spyware program belonging to a particularly dangerous class of browser hijacking tools called CoolWebSearch (CWS), according to Sunbelt's president, Alex Eckelberry. CWS programs are extremely hard to detect and remove, and are used to redirect users to Web sites that use spyware tools to collect a variety of information from infected computers.

The CWS variant being researched by Sunbelt turned infected systems into spam zombies and uploaded a wide variety of personal information to a remote server apparently located in the U.S. That server holds a "treasure trove of information" for ID thieves, Eckelberry said.

Sunbelt's research showed that the information being uploaded to the remote server included chat sessions, user names, passwords and bank information, he said. The bank information included details on one company bank account with more than $350,000 in deposits and another belonging to a small California company with over $11,000 in readily accessible cash, he said.

Many of the records being uploaded also contained eBay account information, he said. Among the highly personal bits of information Sunbelt was able to retrieve from the server were one family's vacation plans, instructions to a limo driver to pick up passengers from an airport and details about one computer user with a penchant for pedophilia.

Sunbelt officials did not say how they accessed the material. But the existence of a large file that the company said it retrieved from the remote server was confirmed by Computerworld. Sunbelt said the file contained user names, addresses, account information, phone numbers, chat session logs, monthly car payment information and salary data.

Tools:  Tools: Post a comment | Link to this news item | Send to a friend | Submit News

 

Post a commentPost a comment

Error: You are not logged in.

In order to leave comments to news articles you must be a Cyber Tech Help Member.

Registration is completely free!  Register to become a member!  Register to become a member

Along with access to leave comments to news articles you will be able to ask any computing questions you might have on the Cyber Tech Help Forums.

 

[ To the top of the page To top | Latest News Latest News | News Archive News Archive | Cyber Tech Help News RSS Feed! ]