Go Back   Cyber Tech Help Support Forums > Hardware > Hardware

Notices

Reply
 
Topic Tools
  #1  
Old July 20th, 2019, 02:01 AM
lauranne44 lauranne44 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 40
Wearing Out Hard Drive?

Thank you for your help.

I recently purchased a computer which has, I think, two drives.
One tradtiional/mechanical and one is "solid state" although I may be mistaken.

My question is, will the computer drives wear out faster if I turn off the computer when not is use, then turn it on again?

My belief was that it was best to leave a machine ON constantly, as turning on and off wears out a mechanical hard drive.

My old machine lasted 8 years running pretty much 24 hours a day all the time.

New machine:

Shinobee / Biostar Group model A960D+V3

Shinobee SSD Ultra 8-Core Gaming PC/Multimedia Desktop Computer - FX 8300 8 x 4.20 GHz - AMD Radeon RX 460 2GB DDR5 Graphics - 8GB DDR3-240GB SSD - 500GB HDD - Win10 Pro - CD/DVD±RW - WiFi #6006
Reply With Quote


  #2  
Old July 20th, 2019, 03:14 AM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Posts: 777
The short answer is: no.

Mechanical hard drives (HDD) made in the last 20 some odd years have been designed to "Park the Heads" on a Safe Zone on the disk platters when power is turned off to the drive.
This keeps the data safe from having the read/write heads causing errors in the Data Files during start ups.
Or causing physical damage to the read/write heads and disk platters when you have to move the computer.

Here is a Wikipedia link on Mechanical Hard Drive Failures.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive_failure
There is quite a bit of information as too how they can fail.

The Life Span Rating of most HDD's is about 6 years.
I've gotten 10 years or more out of some HDD's.
So 8 years isn't bad at all.

Here is a Wikipedia link on Solid-State Drives.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid-state_drive
There is quite a bit of information as too how they function,
how to maintain them, and how they can fail.

The Life Span Rating of most SSD's is about 3-4 years.
But in my experience, you will be lucky to get 2-3 years out of the consumer grade SSD's verses the Enterprise(Business) based SSD's.

Because SSD's are faster than HDD's.
Most people put the Operating System(Windows, Linux, Etc...) on the SSD,
and Programs(Games), Documents, Music, Videos, Pictures on to the HDD.
Where speed isn't an issue.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old July 20th, 2019, 05:03 PM
lauranne44 lauranne44 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ensign Tzap View Post
The short answer is: no.

Mechanical hard drives (HDD) made in the last 20 some odd years have been designed to "Park the Heads" on a Safe Zone on the disk platters when power is turned off to the drive.
This keeps the data safe from having the read/write heads causing errors in the Data Files during start ups.
Or causing physical damage to the read/write heads and disk platters when you have to move the computer.

Here is a Wikipedia link on Mechanical Hard Drive Failures.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive_failure
There is quite a bit of information as too how they can fail.

The Life Span Rating of most HDD's is about 6 years.
I've gotten 10 years or more out of some HDD's.
So 8 years isn't bad at all.

Here is a Wikipedia link on Solid-State Drives.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid-state_drive
There is quite a bit of information as too how they function,
how to maintain them, and how they can fail.

The Life Span Rating of most SSD's is about 3-4 years.
But in my experience, you will be lucky to get 2-3 years out of the consumer grade SSD's verses the Enterprise(Business) based SSD's.

Because SSD's are faster than HDD's.
Most people put the Operating System(Windows, Linux, Etc...) on the SSD,
and Programs(Games), Documents, Music, Videos, Pictures on to the HDD.
Where speed isn't an issue.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
WOW, thank you for that information! I was under the impression that a Solid State Drive was LONGER LASTING than an HDD, therefore the safest place to strore things.

So, what you are saying is, it is Best to Turn Off the comptuer when not in use?



When the old computer started crashing every other day, I got an external HDD to store things I couuld not likely replace.

Thank you for the links.

Now I need to figure out the RAM issue and find out if I am overheating.

,
,
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old July 20th, 2019, 05:43 PM
renegade600's Avatar
renegade600 renegade600 is offline
Certifiable Bum
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
O/S: Linux
Location: Osceola, Ar
Posts: 26,446
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauranne44 View Post
WOW, thank you for that information! I was under the impression that a Solid State Drive was LONGER LASTING than an HDD, therefore the safest place to strore things.

So, what you are saying is, it is Best to Turn Off the comptuer when not in use?



When the old computer started crashing every other day, I got an external HDD to store things I couuld not likely replace.

Thank you for the links.

Now I need to figure out the RAM issue and find out if I am overheating.

,
,
imo, it does not make any difference if you turn the computer off or not though it is a subject thats been debated for years. When the computer is not in use, everything has winded down so it does not continue running. I have several computer I have not turned off in years other than after updates or power outages.

as far as the old computer crashing, if desktop, one way to find out if it is overheating is to take off the cover and run it as normal. maybe even have a small fan blowing into it. if it still crashes, it is not heat. if it does not crash, then, most likely, it is a heat problem.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old July 20th, 2019, 07:28 PM
lauranne44 lauranne44 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by renegade600 View Post
imo, it does not make any difference if you turn the computer off or not though it is a subject thats been debated for years. When the computer is not in use, everything has winded down so it does not continue running. I have several computer I have not turned off in years other than after updates or power outages.

as far as the old computer crashing, if desktop, one way to find out if it is overheating is to take off the cover and run it as normal. maybe even have a small fan blowing into it. if it still crashes, it is not heat. if it does not crash, then, most likely, it is a heat problem.
Thank you. My concern is, will leaving the new machine on All the time cause it to eventually overheat or otherwise wear out?

As for the Old machine, someone was advising me to run some kind of RAM scanner. This thing literally takes DAYS to finish the scan run, and since I was on the machine each day, that was impossible.

now that I have a new machiene, I may hook up the old one, and run that RAM scan diagnostic thing that takes so long.

Would be interesting if it stats working again, I might be able to sell it. It works now but crashes ever single day BSOD
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Topic Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:54 AM.