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  #16  
Old April 12th, 2009, 04:28 AM
Spider's Avatar
Spider Spider is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2001
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 12,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper2003 View Post
I went to the drives and hit enter to install and it didn't do anything.

If I hit enter on the highlighted items all it does is return me to the setup screen.
I still have the old BIOS-is that the problem. Version A09
Run that BIOS update to A12, it may make changes in the BIOS settings we can use.
Quote:
Re: Outlook I don't think I ever compressed files or exported-so does that mean I am out of luck with retrieving them?
Yes, out of luck.
Check that Dell restore CD to see if there is some kind of "Repair" option in there. If I remember Dell CDs
(I don't have one to look at) they don't have a repair type of option but make sure, you have the CD I don't.

Quote:
Believe me I feel awful about not backing this up-I always meant to but never did-it's sickening really
and I have no one to blame but me.
This is a point everyone reaches in computer use eventually. You ask anyone who has had a computer
for a few years and has had the situation of a failed drive and all data, hours of work, projects, life list of
phone numbers and addresses. It just is too much to lose and when we do lose it only then do we
understand why all the veterans of computer use say "BACK UP!"

The basic idea is "Trust a hard drive about as much as you trust a wolf in a butcher shop" Buy a few
USB sticks (flash drives). I like Kingston 32GB sticks, 16GB are less expensive. I like sticks for a few of reasons.
One - they offer way more storage than a DVD at 4.7GB maximum (doublers go to 8GB)
Two - they don't scratch like a DVD and become unreadable
Three - you can write or read (copy to or copy from) unlike a once burned DVD that you can't write to (add more files, delete files from).
Four - you don't have to reboot or stop anything to plug or unplug a stick into a computer (hot-swappable)

One step further in back up is drive imaging (not cloning but imaging). Drive imaging is a complete copy of the hard drive
down to the smallest degree, files, Windows, boot up information, partition information, file system information...the works.
When you image a drive it is saved to one humongous file that you save to another hard drive. If your original drive goes
bad then you re-image a new hard drive with your backed up image and within a short amount of time you have Windows,
your email, documents, pictures, files, hours of work, whole life...back on a new drive exactly like the day you imaged it.
Boom! Everything back in one shot.

Acronis True Image Home 2009 seems to perform the best out of all of them. There are free ones and there are other paid
ones but Acronis does everything fast (data on and data off) and it performs like a champ and it's only 50 bucks.
50 bucks to insure your computer life.

I always have a USB stick in my pocket where ever I go. I can't remember the last time I burned a back up DVD it was so long ago.
I don't trust hard drives and I don't trust DVDs, I trust Kingston and sticks.
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  #17  
Old April 12th, 2009, 12:17 PM
Pepper2003 Pepper2003 is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
O/S: Windows XP Home
Posts: 158
Good advice and one I will follow from now on.

Everyone in the family is getting their own memory stick.

Part of the problem is I didn't know how to back up the Outlook files and I never took the time to figure it out.

I didn't know how to back up the Sims data files and again never took the time to figure it out.

Of course the time I have spent just with this has far exceeded the time it would have taken to learn how to back them up.

Pictures are easy and most of them are backed up.

I did find many .dbx Outlook files on the bad drive and moved them to this laptop-maybe I can figure out how to do something with them.

Email from now on is going to be kept on a server.

The Windows CD does have a repair option-maybe I can copy the file it says it's missing and get in there.

I have such a long tortured history with this particular computer-if you ever have time and want a laugh search a thread I had going about two years ago re: replacing a video card.

Thanks for helping me.
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  #18  
Old April 12th, 2009, 05:05 PM
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Spider Spider is offline
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O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper2003 View Post
I didn't know how to back up the Outlook files
Microsoft shows...How to back up and to restore Outlook Express data text tutorial.

How to back up messages (emails) and folder in Outlook Express graphical tutorial.

How to back up messages (emails) and folder in Outlook Express YouTube video tutorial.

How to back up your Address Book in Outlook Express YouTube video tutorial.


You'll also need to back up your Outlook Express Accounts information (the settings for your email account, pop3. smtp. etc)
Can't find a decent video so...
Outlook Express's menu
Tools
Accounts...
Mail(tab)
click once on top of your account
Export(button)
the file is named (your account name).iaf and ready to save to your destination (USB stick)

to get that (your account name).iaf back into your Outlook Express
Outlook Express's menu
Tools
Accounts...
Mail(tab)
Import(button)
select your file named (your account name).iaf
Open

*.PST is a weird thing. It was in older Outlook Express and it's in the newer Outlooks (Office Outlooks).
It is better (on reflection) to back up Outlook Express in the above fashions, this way you have the
three important items within Outlook Express [backed up]...
Contacts
Emails
Account settings

...these three together make up what Outlook is and what we cringe-to-lose.

Another popular back up item, the favorites list in Internet Explorer
(for Windows XP)
Open a Windows Explorer (Windows key + E key)
C:
Documents and Settings
(user name)
Favorites
<---- save that puppy.
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  #19  
Old April 13th, 2009, 03:46 AM
Pepper2003 Pepper2003 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
O/S: Windows XP Home
Posts: 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spider View Post
Microsoft shows...How to back up and to restore Outlook Express data text tutorial.

How to back up messages (emails) and folder in Outlook Express graphical tutorial.

How to back up messages (emails) and folder in Outlook Express YouTube video tutorial.

How to back up your Address Book in Outlook Express YouTube video tutorial.


You'll also need to back up your Outlook Express Accounts information (the settings for your email account, pop3. smtp. etc)
Can't find a decent video so...
Outlook Express's menu
Tools
Accounts...
Mail(tab)
click once on top of your account
Export(button)
the file is named (your account name).iaf and ready to save to your destination (USB stick)

to get that (your account name).iaf back into your Outlook Express
Outlook Express's menu
Tools
Accounts...
Mail(tab)
Import(button)
select your file named (your account name).iaf
Open

*.PST is a weird thing. It was in older Outlook Express and it's in the newer Outlooks (Office Outlooks).
It is better (on reflection) to back up Outlook Express in the above fashions, this way you have the
three important items within Outlook Express [backed up]...
Contacts
Emails
Account settings

...these three together make up what Outlook is and what we cringe-to-lose.

Another popular back up item, the favorites list in Internet Explorer
(for Windows XP)
Open a Windows Explorer (Windows key + E key)
C:
Documents and Settings
(user name)
Favorites
<---- save that puppy.

Thanks for all the great info.

No excuses next time.
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