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  #1  
Old June 17th, 2016, 07:57 AM
Kittenlover Kittenlover is offline
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New computer, white screening and then gray screening. Restart makes it fine.

I'm using windows 10 right now with a new system, and just recently got a crash to a grey screen. I restarted to an update and thought nothing of it until it happened again with a white screen. I checked reliability monitor and it says hardware failure but nothing past that, and everything seems nice and cool and new in my computer.

Specs: Mobo: Asrock Fatal1ty Professional gaming z170
CPU: i5-6600k
PSU: T850w
HDD: WD blue 1tb
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws v series DDR 2400, 2 x 8gb
GPU: ATI Radeon 5750

Zero idea why any of this is happening.
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  #2  
Old June 17th, 2016, 05:23 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittenlover View Post
I'm using windows 10 right now with a new system, and just recently got a crash to a grey screen. I restarted to an update and thought nothing of it until it happened again with a white screen. I checked reliability monitor and it says hardware failure but nothing past that, and everything seems nice and cool and new in my computer.

Specs: Mobo: Asrock Fatal1ty Professional gaming z170
CPU: i5-6600k
PSU: T850w
HDD: WD blue 1tb
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws v series DDR 2400, 2 x 8gb
GPU: ATI Radeon 5750

Zero idea why any of this is happening.
1)Try connecting up a different Monitor too your Computer.

If you have got the display back.
See if the original Monitor is still under Warranty.
If it is, then get an RMA to have it replaced.

If there is no change.

Then it sounds like your Video Card has failed.

2)I'd try swapping in a different Video Card first.
If you have video after swapping in the other Video Card.

Check the Warranty on your ATI Radeon 5750 Video Card.
If it is still under Warranty.
Get an RMA from AMD to get the Video Card Replaced.

Good luck with it.


Signed:Ensign Tzap

Last edited by Ensign Tzap; June 17th, 2016 at 07:17 PM.
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  #3  
Old June 18th, 2016, 02:37 PM
Appzalien Appzalien is offline
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Posts: 514
Make sure your Asrock motherboard mounts are correct. I can't remember if it was asrock or abit that got me that way. There was a mount hole where a stand off could go that was not meant to have a standoff and screw. It took me months to figure out. A mount hole with no solder ring is not meant to be used even if it's in the position where a standoff can go. No solder means it's not meant as a ground and should not be used.
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  #4  
Old June 18th, 2016, 04:02 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Location: Nebraska, USA
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When assembling any computer, it is always critical to ensure you only install case standoffs where there is a corresponding motherboard mounting hold - regardless the brand or model of the motherboard, or case.

And note too, there should never be a mounting hole in any motherboard with no "solder ring". We've built/upgraded many 100s of computers and never seen holes in motherboards not meant to used to secure the board to the case.

The solder ring is there to make continuity for a ground to the case at that point. Motherboards have many grounding points to ensure all circuits have a good, short, and "common" path to "chassis" ground - a very good thing. Any extra standoff is likely to short a circuit to ground. A bad thing.

If this is a new build, I agree it may be worth it to pull the board and verify any standoff is located where there is a corresponding motherboard mounting hole, and that no other foreign object (like a loose screw) slipped under the board. If this computer was assembled some time ago and worked fine before, it is not likely a standoff issue.

Other than that, I always want to verify good power before anything else when it comes to hardware problems. So make sure you have made all the necessary power connections and that they are all tight and secure. Note that many graphics cards require 1 or 2 additional power connections directly from the PSU. And most motherboards require at least 1 extra connection besides the bit main power connector.

If all connections are made and secure, I recommend swapping supplies with a known good one - especially before replacing any parts that depend on good, clean stable power (which is EVERYTHING inside your computer case).

Note that even the best PSU makers can have units that don't meet required specs or fail prematurely, or be damaged due to physical abuse or excessive power anomalies.
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  #5  
Old June 18th, 2016, 11:45 PM
Appzalien Appzalien is offline
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The one board this happened to me on was the only one I ever ran into, so I agree that it should never happen. I blame the manufacturer. Not only can you get new bad parts but you can also get parts that were returned as bad, briefly tested and sold again. I could find the board and take a picture of the solder-less hole but its not worth the effort. Believe me it happened and was a bear to figure out.
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  #6  
Old June 19th, 2016, 05:07 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Quote:
I blame the manufacturer.
I agree but I suspect it was a manufacturing defeat on that specific board that slipped by quality assurance inspections (if there were any) before leaving the factory, and not by design for that model board. Otherwise, there would be virtually every custom builder (home and small shops) using that model board who encountered that problem. And since ASRock and Abit are popular board makers, there likely would have been many many users complaining making lots of noise and bringing lots of attention to this problem. But that did not happen.

It actually would have been nice if it were a "design" flaw instead of a "one-off" manufacturing defect because then it would have quickly become a "reported" problem and you most likely would have found the solution (don't use a standoff there) quickly too - without raising your blood pressure (too much) or losing large clumps of hair!
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  #7  
Old June 26th, 2016, 10:33 PM
Appzalien Appzalien is offline
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Actually I did learn about it online while searching the motherboard model number and describing the problem, but the search didn't bring up the manufacturers forum or web site and the answer was three or four pages deep into the suggested search links. So there was another user who discovered it and that's what I meant by a bear to figure out as there was no simple answer from the manufacturer or their knowledge base. After I found that post I pulled the board and found the hole with no solder. And as a manufacturer defect, if it was meant to have solder it would not have shorted out the board. I also once got a back plate ground (meant to rest on top of the the little metal boxes for usb and or audio) stuck inside the top usb slot that cased issues. I found that myself with a flashlight. Now I check carefully when mounting my boards.There are some weird things that can happen when building your own including putting a standoff where there is no hole on the board if your not careful.
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  #8  
Old June 27th, 2016, 04:05 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Quote:
So there was another user who discovered it
Okay, but "one other" user still suggests a manufacturing defect and not a design flaw. Design flaws affect the whole manufacturing run, or runs depending on how long it takes to discover the problem. At any rate, that was some good hunting to track that problem down!

Quote:
And as a manufacturer defect, if it was meant to have solder it would not have shorted out the board.
Right - I didn't say or suggest otherwise. I only said any "extra" standoff is "likely" to short a circuit to ground.

And yes, as noted in my first sentence of my first reply, it is "always critical" to ensure you only install standoffs where there is a corresponding motherboard mounting hole. Not doing so is a common newbie mistake that also happens to distracted experienced users too!
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  #9  
Old July 6th, 2016, 02:26 PM
Appzalien Appzalien is offline
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So have any of us actually helped KittenLover? I wonder if the cat(s) randomly hit keys while walking on the keyboard.
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  #10  
Old July 12th, 2016, 12:59 PM
John Michel John Michel is offline
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There could be followinfg reasons-
1. You should check all the connections that you have made in your computer
2. it could a bad monitor or a low power supply
3. Corrupt drivers for any recently installed hardware can crash the system
4. Bad video/graphics card
5. BIOS - the booting software may be corrupted - Use of Recovery Console to boot system
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