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  #1  
Old December 1st, 2017, 12:15 AM
IPR512's Avatar
IPR512 IPR512 is offline
Jill
 
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O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
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I'm looking for a Linux version that I can run from a DVD without installing it.

Hi
I'm trying to find a version of Linux that I can burn to a DVD, and boot from it. I want to try it out without installing it on a hard drive.
Does anybody know where I can download it from?
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  #2  
Old December 1st, 2017, 10:47 AM
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smurfy smurfy is offline
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Hi Jill, many mainstream Linux versions will allow "live" use without a hard drive install. This can be CD/DVD/USBFlash (depending on what the hardware supports as a boot drive).
e.g. Mint.
Quote:
Originally Posted by https://linuxmint.com/documentation/user-guide/Cinnamon/english_18.0.pdf
Install Linux Mint on your Hard Drive
From the first screen choose the default “Start Linux Mint” option and press Enter. After
a little while the live system should be ready and you should see the desktop.
At this stage Linux Mint is not installed on your computer, it’s simply running from the
DVD. The system you have in front of you is, however, almost exactly the same as the
one you will have on your computer after the installation is finished.
Have fun with it and see if you like it. Bear in mind that when running from the DVD,
Linux Mint runs significantly slower than it does when it is installed on a hard drive,
since it has to read data from the DVD drive, which is a slower medium than the hard
drive.
You can even buy usb or flash drive versions

Your main system will also comfortably run a virtual machine (I still prefer Oracle Virtual Box) that will let you boot a live distro from the ISO without even needing to burn it to media.
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  #3  
Old December 1st, 2017, 11:05 AM
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smurfy smurfy is offline
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See the image below - boot menu of a random Linux ISO mounted as the boot device on a VM.
Attached Images
File Type: png VirtualBoxLiveLinuxBoot.png (145.1 KB, 6 views)
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  #4  
Old December 1st, 2017, 03:13 PM
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IPR512 IPR512 is offline
Jill
 
Join Date: May 2006
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Tampabay area of Florida
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Hi Smurfy
Thanks for your help.
I was sitting here thinking that my old computer that my husband only uses once a day, and has Windows 7 64 bit with 6GB of ram may be a good idea to use as a guinea pig instead of my computer.
Besides the main hard drive in that computer I have a removable hard drive rack that I can put another hard drive in, and probably boot from that if I install Linux on it.
That computer was built in 2007 though so I don't know if the newest version of Linux will run on it, but I'm going to give it a shot as soon as I can.
Thanks again for your help. Will let you know how I make out.
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  #5  
Old December 1st, 2017, 05:47 PM
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renegade600 renegade600 is offline
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I have older computers thats running the latest versions :-) however if you have problems with linux mint, give puppy linux. it is made specifically for older computers.

http://puppylinux.com/
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  #6  
Old December 1st, 2017, 06:17 PM
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IPR512 IPR512 is offline
Jill
 
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Thanks Dan, I'll keep that in mind.
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  #7  
Old December 1st, 2017, 08:44 PM
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IPR512 IPR512 is offline
Jill
 
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Location: Tampabay area of Florida
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I made the Linux Mint 64 bit DVD, and booted up with it, but it took awhile before I actually saw something other than the Linux logo and five moving dots. I did this on my own computer, not the older one with 6GB of memory.
I couldn't really tell much about Linux that way though so as soon as I have a chance I'm going to try to install it on the old computer on a second hard drive.
What's the best way to dual boot so that when the computer starts up I have a choice of which drive to boot up to?
Thanks for any help.
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  #8  
Old December 2nd, 2017, 02:55 AM
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smurfy smurfy is offline
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Yes, I DVD live distro is much slower than an installed one. It is limited by read speed of the drive and RAM.

Rather than dual boot, for a first time I would recommend disconnecting the existing Win7 hard disk (unplug the SATA cable physically from the drive) when you install a spare disk inside. Then there is no risk of affecting the Win7 install or more importantly, corrupting the boot sector (repairing that is more of a pain from Vista onwards).

The GRUB bootloader can be modified later to allow booting back into the Win7 disk when you reconnect it.
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  #9  
Old December 2nd, 2017, 03:06 AM
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smurfy smurfy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IPR512 View Post
Hi Smurfy
Thanks for your help.
I was sitting here thinking that my old computer that my husband only uses once a day, and has Windows 7 64 bit with 6GB of ram may be a good idea to use as a guinea pig instead of my computer.
Besides the main hard drive in that computer I have a removable hard drive rack that I can put another hard drive in, and probably boot from that if I install Linux on it.
That computer was built in 2007 though so I don't know if the newest version of Linux will run on it, but I'm going to give it a shot as soon as I can.
Thanks again for your help. Will let you know how I make out.
I'm about to build a Linux-based "free" music creation worksatation for my daughter with a 10 year old Q6600@2.4Ghz and 2GB DDR2 and I expect a current distro to run OK (although I'll want to throw more RAM at it). Kodibuntu (based on a Ubuntu version that is a couple of years old) ran just fine on it.
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  #10  
Old December 2nd, 2017, 03:10 AM
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IPR512 IPR512 is offline
Jill
 
Join Date: May 2006
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Tampabay area of Florida
Posts: 2,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by smurfy View Post
Yes, I DVD live distro is much slower than an installed one. It is limited by read speed of the drive and RAM.

Rather than dual boot, for a first time I would recommend disconnecting the existing Win7 hard disk (unplug the SATA cable physically from the drive) when you install a spare disk inside. Then there is no risk of affecting the Win7 install or more importantly, corrupting the boot sector (repairing that is more of a pain from Vista onwards).

The GRUB bootloader can be modified later to allow booting back into the Win7 disk when you reconnect it.
Thanks for telling me to disconnect the Windows 7 drive, I would've never thought to do that.
The second hard drive will be inside a removable hard drive rack.
How can I modify the GRUB bootloader so that I can boot into Windows 7?
Thanks for your help Smurfy.
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  #11  
Old December 2nd, 2017, 05:30 AM
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Jaytee Jaytee is offline
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Hi Jill,
I think Smurfy answered that in The post just before yours
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  #12  
Old December 2nd, 2017, 07:20 AM
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smurfy smurfy is offline
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Because you are not sure at this stage that you will be keeping this system as a dual-boot, my recommendation would be the following process:
  1. Disconnect Win7 HDD
  2. Add spare HDD (external is OK as long as BIOS can be set to boot from it
  3. Install Linux to spare HDD
  4. Play around and see if you want to keep it
  5. Try different distros/desktop managers if you don't like the first one you try
  6. Shut down
  7. Reconnect Win7 HDD
  8. Disconnect Linux HDD
  9. Make sure system boots to Windows OK
  10. Reconnect spare HDD
  11. Reinstall your preferred Linux distro to the spare HDD
  12. Installer should see existing Windows OS and automatically add it to GRUB to allow dual-boot.

Step 11 and 12 can be replaced by a GRUB edit and change to the BIOS HDD boot order, but is easier to just let the installer do it.
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  #13  
Old December 2nd, 2017, 02:58 PM
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IPR512 IPR512 is offline
Jill
 
Join Date: May 2006
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Tampabay area of Florida
Posts: 2,165
Thanks again for all your help Smurfy.
I'm beginning to think that I had better hold off on fooling around with Linux for now.
A friend is willing to give me an old Dell Dimension 4700 to try to put Linux on. I would have to find a place for the Dell though, and space is limited.
With Christmas coming, and work needing to be done in my computer room that involves a new ceiling, and moving, and removing of furniture I think it best that I just leave well enough alone for now.
I really appreciate all the time you've taken, and the help you have given.
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